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Sweat

What’s Sweat Got to Do with It???????

 “New research shows that nearly 5% of the world’s population suffers from excessive sweating or hyperhidrosis.  According to the International hyperhidrosis society (https://www.sweathelp.org), 365 million people are struggling with extreme sweating”1.

     Whether it is a friendship or friendships which have you entertaining, or just hanging out with friends – Excessive sweating at best can be just annoying or at worst down – right embarrassing.  So, what’s sweat got to do with it?  This could make or break a friendship, not because a true friend would exclude you because of profuse sweating problems, but more likely it would embarrass a person to the point of excluding themselves from activities they’d like to do with friends – whether it is hiking the Appalachian Trail, barbequing in the backyard, playing volleyball, tennis, or golf – going to exercise class or just having a picnic – sweating could be a real detriment!  Especially in the summer months when many of us vacation and are more prone to visit family members and friends in different regions of the country.

     Uncontrollable sweating or the clinical term hyperhidrosis can be a nuisance – in that a person is having to change clothing several times a day or shower several times a day.  This can interfere with spending valuable time with friends and family.

     Now, another issue that affects us when dealing with heavy sweating is how it can negatively affect our daily life from clothing choices, material, color and design of clothes, etc.  For example, many heavy sweaters avoid wearing bright colors such as blue or red, in favor of black and white.  People with plantar hyperhidrosis or (foot-sweating) avoid wearing certain footwear such as sandals or flip-flops.  Also, certain materials like polyester may be avoided in favor of cotton.  Also, certain foods may be avoided that are associated with heavy sweating such as drinks containing alcohol, or caffeine, while others could no longer enjoy spicy foods or hot foods.  Some could no longer enjoy holiday destinations because they were too warm.

     Certain hobbies were affected due to extreme sweating of hands, feet, and/or underarms.  For example, some physical and some non-physical such as exercising, bike riding, walking, and playing musical instruments.  One person said, “I don’t like going for walks, [—] people tend to look at me as if I am really sweaty and that makes me really nervous”1.  Also, something as simple as reading a book or newspapers has become difficult for people suffering from palmar hyperhidrosis or (hand-sweating).

     Other areas of concern for sufferers of excessive sweating were just performing household chores such as turning door handles, driving, working with tools, difficulties holding objects and more.  Even collecting change or coins was difficult due to sweaty hands.  Things that most of us would not even think about!!  Other household chores that could become dubious were cleaning, ironing, mopping, vacuuming and cooking.  Many of these activities lead to such profuse sweating of hands, feet, and underarms or more that these normal activities become almost unbearable.

     Many excessive sweating sufferers feel that they have restrictions on their life due to their problem.  They are unable to participate in “normal everyday events” that their cohorts can!!  Among these would be going on a date, a job interview or just shaking hands.  Social situations such as going out to a party, sharing an office, or just going to the movies are challenging.  Even travelling to and from work posed issues.  Also, physical contact can pose problems.  Many suffering from some form of hyperhidrosis avoid touching, holding, sitting next to others, dancing, and shaking hands.  Even cuddling or hugging can be unpleasant.

     How does excessive sweating affect socializing or one’s social life?  Here are some of the statistics reported in the medical literature related to the social and emotional impacts of Hyperhidrosis. 

     *Five percent of Hh sufferers indicate they take antidepressants or anti-anxiety medication due to their sweating

      *Decreased confidence

      *Low self-esteem

      *Being uncomfortable when physically close to others because they are afraid of people’s reactions to their sweating.  As a result, they avoid touching, holding hands, sitting next to others, physical affection, even standing in line.

     Why does profuse sweating in the workplace cause a serious problem?  Hyperhidrosis can be devastating in work environments for many reasons especially “when image is everything”.  Men and women involved in the entertainment industry whether it be modeling, film, musicals, etc. deal with the bright lighting.  People who suffer from hyperhidrosis it is exponentially worse.  “Dramatic sweating in the presence of peers at work, or environments like team dinners, expos, conferences, customer meetings, happy hours, and other events can cause severe embarrassment, stress anxiety, and other emotional issues”1.

     Here are a list of true facts concerning hyperhidrosis from the experts at the Hyperhidrosis Society:

     *In a 2017 study, 63 percent of these with Hh reported interference in the performance tasks at work or school due to their condition.

     *Stains on clothing is antiperspirant combined with your sweat that causes staining. Apply your antiperspirant at night to avoid this

     *People with Hh(hyperhidrosis) which causes (overactive sweat glands) sweat excessively regardless of mood, weather, or activity level – often producing 4 or 5 times more sweat than is considered normal

     *Want to help your body get rid of bad stuff?  Sweating does not actually rid your body of “toxins” – your kidneys, liver, lungs, and digestive system for that. The best way to detox is staying hydrated, exercising, and eating the right things.

     *Men sweat more than women.  Scientists point to testosterone, which enhances a men’s sweat response.  Basically, women need to get hotter before they start to sweat.  Another reason why men sweat more is because they are often bigger; the bigger the body the more heat it generates, the more it needs to cool down.

     *There are two types of sweat glands that each produce their own type of sweat eccrine and apocrine sweat.  Eccrine sweat is odorless clear fluid that helps the body to control its temperature by promoting heat loss through evaporation.  Apocrine sweat, on the other hand, is “stress” sweat and apocrine glands are found mostly in the armpits and genital region. The odor produced is that characteristic potent smell we call “body odor”.

     *Be sure to use your antiperspirant in the evenings, as well as in the morning.  Sweat production is at its lowest at night, giving the active ingredients in antiperspirants time overnight to get into your pores and block perspiration by the time the sun comes up and you get moving.

     *According to Dr. Pariser, Hh(hyperhidrosis) has the greatest impact of any dermatological disease.  In fact, various investigations show the impact of hyperhidrosis on quality-of-life is equal or greater than that of inpatient psoriasis, severe acne, Darier disease, Hailey-Hailey disease, vitiligo, and chronic pruritus.

     So, the question is:  What’s Monray Antiperspirant Got to Do with It?  Monray Antiperspirant contains the strongest/or most powerful clinical strength ingredients to fight excessive sweating.  So, if you are suffering from sweaty underarms, sweaty hands, or sweaty feet – Monray Antiperspirant or https://www.monrayantiperspirant.com  Monray offers an underarm roll-on antiperspirant, a hand spray, and a foot spray to combat hyperhidrosis.

     Consider that many of the products purchased contain a crucial ingredient called aluminum chloride.  Aluminum chloride is a chemical compound used in many antiperspirant products. “Aluminum chloride topical is an over-the-counter ingredient used to treat severe, recalcitrant excessive sweating.  Aluminum chloride has a very high efficacy rating”1.

     Monray Antiperspirant has a much higher efficacy rating than many of its competitors.  This is due to it having a higher concentration of aluminum chloride.  Aluminum chloride is found in most antiperspirants, but its content levels differ.  The other ingredient used in some antiperspirants is sesquichlorohydrate; it is an aluminum salt with a low efficacy rating.  It is not as strong as the aluminum chloride used in Monray Antiperspirant.

     Monray Antiperspirant contains no alcohol; therefore, it does not have as much of a chance of irritating the skin.  It contains glycerin which is soothing to the skin.  “Glycerol is a simple polyol compound.  It is colorless, odorless, and non-toxic.  The glycerol background is found in those lipids known as glycerides.  Due to having antimicrobial and antiviral properties – glycerin – is widely FDA approved for wound/burn treatments, as well as cosmetics and antiperspirants”1. 

     The application process of Monray Antiperspirant is quite simple.  The underarm product is applied before bedtime.  So, if a person takes their shower in the morning or at night, the product still needs to be applied before going to sleep.  This is due to less sweating persisting during sleeping hours allowing Monray Antiperspirant to adhere to the sweat duct – while the person is at rest.  Then, the client can take a morning shower knowing that the product has been hard at work at night or during sleeping hours if that occurs during the day.  The Monray Antiperspirant Hand/Foot product needs to be applied the same way during sleeping times.

     A positive consideration when purchasing Monray Antiperspirant is that it can be applied every other day.  This is not only more convenient, but it is also more cost effective.

     So, what’s sweat got to do with it??  Nothing!!!  When you use Monray Antiperspirant, it will solve your excessive sweating problem whether it is your underarms, hands or feet!!  Buy Monray Antiperspirant and stop sweating!! 

References               

1 International Hyperhidrosis Society (https://www.sweathelp.org)

Hand Antiperspirant.  The New Wave?

Hand Antiperspirant. The New Wave?

Why in the 21st century are we hearing more about hand sweat? Could it be that it affects all walks of life – whether you are the Wall Street Broker – heading up stressful meetings with clients, other brokers, bosses, and corporations. Maybe, you are a professional athlete that uses your hands to catapult to a whole new level of success. Then, there are thousands of jobs that require the use of our hands: plumbers, auto-mechanics, electricians, welders, surgeons, nurses, teachers, and the list goes on and on. Not to mention the arts: music performers, artist, sculptors and much more. Whatever your occupation or circumstances that require you to be calm, cool, and collected; hand- sweating is a major detriment!

Let us look at some of the heavy causes of hand sweat that are not caused by disease. “Examples include warm temperatures, exercise, stress, or spicey foods”1.

“The hottest states in the U.S. are Florida, Texas, Louisiana, and Hawaii. However, in the summer months many states average between 75 – 98 degrees except for the further most states NW states like Oregon, Washington, Montana, and Idaho; however, the high temperatures from June – September are found not only in the most southern states, but also in the western states, southeast states, and northeastern states. So, about three – fourths of the country experience some significant heat. This is one cause of hand sweat that is being seen throughout the U.S.A.”2 Sales of hand antiperspirants spike in the summer months.

“It is noted that in 2018 about 19.1 percent of the U.S. population exercises. This would be a little less than one – fifth of the population. Exercise whether it is associated with work or physical exercise can cause hand sweating”.3.

Stress whether due to social anxiety, timelines needing to be met, personal issues that need to be resolved, pressure at the workplace or at home. “About 30 percent of people throughout the U.S. report feeling extreme stress. This stress manifest itself at times with heavy sweating of the hands, feet, or underarms”.4 So, as you can see, there are many factors associated with hand – sweating.

“One other factor involved in heavy sweating of the hands is consuming spicy foods. Some people breakout in a visible sweat or their hands begin sweating after indulging in these spices. Spices to avoid curry, chili con carne, hot sauce, tabasco sauce, salsa, jalapenos and more”.4

The different types of job requirements have sky-rocketed over the past 50 years. “the biggest industries are: Public Schools, Hospitals, Fast Food Restaurants, Office Staffing/Temp Agencies, College/Universities, Full-Service Restaurants, Professional Organizations, Supermarkets, Shoe Industry, and IT Consulting”.5

“Our country produces 37 percent of the petroleum used in the U.S.A. Along with a large livestock industry and agriculture industry”.5.

Whether it is the public school system/college/universities – the educational system has had to become tech savvy for students to be able to meet the educational requirements of the 21st century and jobs they will be doing in the future. How does this apply to hand sweating? With the use of computers, iPads, iPods, xeroxing, faxing, texting, and much more – people with hyperhidrosis associated with the hands need to be sweat free at the workplace. While many people never encounter this problem; there is “according to AHN and his collaborators in the UCLA Department of Human Genetics, the study indicates that as many as five percent of the population may be at risk for some form of hyperhidrosis, commonly known as sweaty hand syndrome which causes heavy sweating most often in the hands or feet”.6.

What about our professional sports athletes or athletes in general: golfers, tennis players, baseball/football players, equestrian sports: jockeys, hunter/jumpers, cow rangers, barrel racers, rodeo competitors, and many more. Sweaty hands could be the difference between winning or losing.

Another huge industry affected by sweaty hands is the medical industry. Some employees have reported the difficulty in implementing certain procedures with sweaty palms. Also, the use of lead aprons during radiological procedures is mandatory protecting either the patient or the radiology technician. Sometimes, these lead aprons must be worn most of the day by the employees this heavy gear can result in heavy sweating.

The food industry is a major concern with sweaty hands. Gloves are worn in food preparation, cleanup, and delivery to ensure protection to customers and food providers. Once again sweaty hands can go right along with the wearing of gloves. Not only can it be extremely uncomfortable but also unsanitary.

“Agriculture, food, and related industries contributed $1,109 trillion to the U.S. gross domestic product in 2019. The output of America’s farms contributed $136.1 billion of the sum. Farming equipment is therefore paramount in the 21st century. Tractors – compact utility tractor, lawn tractors, shovels, hoes, tillers, and much more are all utilized when farming. Machinery makes possible the sewing, harvesting, and transport of produce. Tractors perform other duties as well like spraying and weeding. Backhoes are used for planting, etc.”7.

Tractors, hoes, backhoes, tillers, and more are used by small, independent farmers who do the same work only on a smaller scale. Farmers may work in the extreme heat or cold either way this can produce sweaty hands. In Florida, orange pickers labor tirelessly to get the oranges picked and transported on a tight schedule. They are dealing with either extreme heat or damp cold. They must use their hands to get this accomplished. So, sweaty hands are not a good thing in the farming industry.

“Another major industry in the U.S. is the petroleum industry. One of the main states drilling for oil is in Texas, as well as the offshore drilling in Louisiana. Texas can literally be the hot spot to work. Whether working on a drill crew, a geologist testing the soil, or engineers making sure guidelines are being followed – the petroleum industry requires much use of drilling equipment, fracking equipment, soil testing and use of heavy equipment. Once again the use of “hands” to stabilize and run equipment is essential”.8 Sweaty hands/palms cannot be tolerated when working with heavy equipment or minimal light weight as well. This could cause accidents that could be detrimental to a company and its employees”.8.

A huge industry in the U.S. that supplies many jobs is the livestock industry. Raising livestock and preparing them to market is a huge responsibility. It can be riddled with many underlying costs. One such expense is “vaccinating cattle to protect against illnesses is important. Overall, almost 7 of 10 operations or 68.9 percent vaccinated beef cattle or calves in 2007. Operations with 50 or more beef cows are most likely to vaccinate”.9.

Another crucial procedure in raising cows is palpation. It is the cheapest and most convenient method of pregnancy testing in a beef cow. “Palpation on most ranches is done usually twice a year”.9 Most ranch hands can perform this duty and sometimes veterinarians are brought in as well. Ranchers perform many duties along with checking on the livestock they are involved in fixing broken fence and securing barb wire. The livestock industry is a “hands on” kind of job. The use of your “hands” to perform duties from palpation to fixing fences/gates is imperative. Ranch hands need to be as sweat free as possible to avoid hands slippage and possible accidents or injury.

As you can see, hand sweating affects all walks of life – from the nervous student trying to present a report – to the stockbroker talking to a client – or even in a social function – such as a dance or being with a group of your peers – hand sweating can cause embarrassment and anxiety. Then not to mention, the many industries where the use of hands is necessary to perform duties – from the teacher using technology to teach – to the rancher working with livestock on a ranch – as well as the farmer and restaurant worker. Hand Sweating can impede their performance.

So, people wonder what is a great product on the market that can stop heavy, hand sweating? Experience has shown that Monray’s Hand Treatment has successfully been shown to stop hand sweating and all types of jobs.

Why is Monray’s Hand Treatment the best on the market? Its active ingredient has shown to have a success rate of 75 percent. It also uses glycerin instead of an alcohol base which is soothing to the skin, so there is no irritation to the hands. Its directions for use are simple. It comes in a spray bottle and is always to be applied while a person is at rest. So, if you sleep at night, then apply right before bedtime making sure your hands are dry. If you work shift work and sleep during the day, then apply on dry hands before you go to sleep during the day.

Remember, so many jobs require use of our hands – Do not be embarrassed or compromised by sweaty hands. Check out Monray’s Hand Treatment.

References:
1 Mayo Clinic
2 Climates to Travel
3 Statista
4 The Recovery Village
5 Dandi Patch
6 UCLA Department of Human Genetics
7 U.S. Agriculture Statistics
8 U.S. Petroleum Statistics
9 U. S. Livestock Statistics

Which Antiperspirant is Best for You ??

Which Antiperspirant is Best for You ??

If you are suffering from some form of hyperhidrosis whether if be sweaty underarms, sweaty hands, or sweaty feet – choosing the right antiperspirant is paramount!!  So, what are some key factors involved in discovering which antiperspirant is best for you?

Confused about which antiperspirant is best for you?

     You may want to consider the antiperspirant with the strongest/or most powerful clinical strength ingredients.  Consider that many of the products can be purchased contain a crucial ingredient called aluminum chloride. Aluminum chloride is a chemical compound used in many antiperspirant products. “Aluminum chloride topical is an over – the – counter product used to treat severe, recalcitrant excessive sweating1. “What does aluminum chloride do for sweat glands?  Each aluminum chloride molecule can covalently bind six water molecules and tightly bind another shell or two of 12 – 20 molecules with a further third shell, all making the water very viscous such that weak muscles that push sweat out of sweat glands are unable to move sweat to the surface of our skin.  Aluminum chloride has a 75% efficacy rating”1.

     Many of the hyperhidrosis antiperspirant products use aluminum sesquichlorohydrate.  What do we know about this? “ It is an aluminum salt that is used as an antiperspirant agent, a deodorant agent and a cosmetic astringent. Aluminum sesquichlorohydrate works by physically blocking eccrine sweat glands.  Aluminum sesquichlorohydrate has a 61% efficacy rating”1.

     Another consideration when searching for the right antiperspirant is using an antiperspirant without alcohol – there are a few products that use glycerin.  The problem in using alcohol mixed with aluminum chloride or aluminum sesquichlorohydrate is that it could possibly cause skin irritation which could deter a potential buyer from using a product.  So, something soothing to the skin whether it is underarms, hands, or feet is especially important when determining the best product for you.

     Another, big consideration when choosing an antiperspirant is the purity of the product.  Many antiperspirants contain parabens.  “Parabens are a class of widely used preservatives in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.  Chemically, they are a series of parahydroxybenzoates or esters of parahydroxybenzoic acid.  Parabens are effective preservatives in many types of formulas”1.

     What are the potential dangers of parabens?  “The concern with these chemicals is that scientific studies suggest that parabens can disrupt hormones, in the body and harm fertility and reproductive organs, affect birth outcomes and increase the risk of cancer.  They can also cause skin irritation”1.

     What are other concerns with parabens?  “Parabens can penetrate the skin and act like a very weak estrogen in the body potentially turning on the growth of hormone – receptor – positive breast cancers.  Parabens have been found in breast tissue and breast cancers”1.

     One other decision when using antiperspirants containing parabens is their impact on the immune system.  “These harmful compounds can injure glandular tissue, upsetting the endocrine system and wreak havoc across the immune system.  Parabens are not proven to cause any autoimmune diseases, but they may well contribute to the toxic burden impacting our health”1.     Another consideration when using an antiperspirant is the ease of use.  In other words, how often will the product have to be reapplied throughout the day for best results?  Are there requirements about how the antiperspirant should be applied and when?  Then, does the antiperspirant last throughout the day; does it need to be reapplied during the day or does it last for several days?

     Here are several tips about getting the most out of your antiperspirant.  You want to be getting the best results for your money, no matter how much you sweat.  We’ve got seven tips from the Hyperhidrosis International Society :2

  • It is important to apply your antiperspirant specifically at night.  While your sweat glands are at rest, the antiperspirant has time to get down into the sweat ducts where they can do their job blocking sweat production.  Also, most people sweat less during the night, so, this makes bedtime the best time to apply the product.  If you applied during the daytime, the daytime sweat would quickly wash off the active ingredients.
  • Be sure if heavy, uncontrollable sweating is your problem, that you are purchasing an antiperspirant and not just a deodorant.  Antiperspirants are used to stop heavy sweating, while deodorants are used to mask odor.  You still need to apply your antiperspirant at night and if you choose to use a deodorant in conjunction with an antiperspirant – that is fine!  Also, there are many combinations out there of antiperspirant/deodorants.  Be sure to research your options before ordering.
  • It is important to avoid shaving before applying an antiperspirant.  This could result in irritation.  If you apply your antiperspirants at night, be sure to shave in the mornings.
  • Another critical tip is to apply your antiperspirant to dry skin.  If your underarms, hands, or feet are damp/wet, the active ingredients will not work as well, and skin irritation is more likely
  • In order for this to be economical be careful on how much antiperspirant you’re using.  When applying to your underarms, two strokes up and two strokes down on each underarm is plenty.  Also, if you are applying your antiperspirant at night, you might not need to apply it every day.  Just experiment with your product to see how many applications per week you will need to get best results.
  • Learn about all your antiperspirant options that way you can make an informed decision about which would be best for you.
  • Always check and see if the company/brand you are choosing from offers specials and coupons to save on those dollars.

     Now, when considering all the factors involved in choosing the right antiperspirant for heavy sweating/hyperhidrosis whether it be used specifically for underarm sweat, hand sweat, or foot sweat what product encapsulates all the different issues mentioned in the material above that is the best product on the market?

     The best product on the market is Monray Antiperspirant!  First, when considering the clinical strength Monray Antiperspirant has a 75% higher efficacy rating than many of its competitors.  This is due to it having a higher concentration of aluminum chloride.  Aluminum chloride is found in most antiperspirants, but its content levels differ.  The other product used in some antiperspirants is sesquichlorohydrate it is an aluminum salt with a 61% efficacy rating. It is not as strong as the aluminum chloride used in Monray Antiperspirant.

     Monray Antiperspirant contains no alcohol; therefore, it does not have as much of a chance of irritating the skin.  It contains glycerin which is soothing to the skin.  “Glycerol is a simple polyol compound.  It is colorless, odorless, and non-toxic.  The glycerol background is found in those lipids known as glycerides.  Due to having an antimicrobial and antiviral properties – glycerin – is widely FDA approved for wound/burn treatments, as well as cosmetics and antiperspirants1.

     Another high-quality factor in using Monray Antiperspirant is the fact that it contains no parabens.  Parabens are widely used preservatives found in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.  This elevates the dangers of using parabens which have been associated with autoimmune issues, hormonal disruptions, skin irritations and increase the risk of cancer.

     The application process of Monray Antiperspirant is quite simple.  The underarm product is applied before bedtime.  So, if a person takes their shower in the morning or at night, the product still needs to be applied before going to sleep.  This is due to less sweating persist during the sleeping hours allowing Monray Antiperspirant to adhere to the sweat duct – while the person is at rest.  Then, the client can take a morning shower knowing that the product has been hard at work at night or during sleeping hours if that occurs during the day.  The Monray Antiperspirant Hand/Foot product needs to be applied the same way during sleeping hours.  Be sure to apply at whatever your bedtime is (during the day/night) giving the product time to absorb into the sweat ducts and stop the sweat.

     A positive consideration when purchasing Monray Antiperspirant is that it can be applied every other day.  This is not only more convenient, but it is also more cost effective.  Because of its every other day application, your product should and would last longer than many products that need to be used every day or several times a day.

     One more consideration when purchasing Monray Antiperspirant is that there are many discounts offered throughout the calendar year.  For instance, many holiday specials are offered.  Also, if you sign up for Monray’s Newsletter you will receive current updates, promotions, and discounts.

     Remember when choosing an antiperspirant that will cover all the bases, that is economical and stops excessive sweating at its core – Buy Monray Antiperspirant and Stop Sweating and Fretting.

                                                   References:

1 Wikipedia

2 International Hyperhidrosis Society

Guest Writer: Melissa Cooners

Sweating When Sick

Sweating When Sick

When everything else has gone wrong, and now China Corona Virus hits you between the eyes, you’re wondering why you sweat when you’ve got a fever, well you’ve come to the right place! It feels bad to have a fever, and fever sweating, perspiring makes an uncomfortable experience even worse – but it’s for a good reason. Then add on the night sweats, bed sweats and even severe hot flashes. You actually begin to feel you have the plague or flu. If you female, you would think you are going through menopause.(Just kidding) The discomfort triggers the nervous system to make changes to the way the body normally protects the body. When trying to decide if you should consider sweating out a cold, most people wonder if they can get up to actually do it. Understanding how exercise helps or hurts a cold, well…

Why the Body Sweats

The main reason the human body sweats is critical for survival – to keep its internal temperature regulated. The process that allows the body to keep its internal temperature controlled is called thermoregulation. This helps to explain why people experience fever sweating and night sweats in the middle of the night. The body has many ways to heat itself up, but when it comes to cooling down its internal temperature the body only has one recourse – sweating. The only other way people can cool their body down is by using cooling behaviors like wearing less clothing, seeking cooler environments, and drinking or bathing your entire body in cool water. This makes sweating necessary for thermoregulation. In fact, sweating can release heat from the body at a rate that is more than ten times higher than a resting body can heat itself up. This just means that sweating is a powerful tool the body uses to quickly get rid of heat and maintain a regular temperature and a major side effect of this is night sweats. It can hit all over the body or hit certain areas like underarm sweat or armpit sweat, hand (palm) sweat, foot sweat, forehead (common), back and groin area. These are all types of hyperhidrosis . Sweat glands are all part of our body’s cooling system. All these symptom areas resemble hyperhidrosis, but this is a totally different medical condition. Some people feel that hyperhidrosis is a sweating sickness. Sweat can be in the daytime or even night sweats or hot flashes correlate to the fever. The cause of night sweats is a relationship of fever levels do increase at night. It comes into play when a person gets sick because a fever raises the body’s internal temperature and the body sweats to cool itself back down. Actually sweating a lot is not a bad thing.

Symptoms

What sets cold sweats and night sweats apart from regular sweating is what the patient is doing when the sweating starts. One would expect to sweat after doing a few jumping jacks or push-ups, but cold sweats come on suddenly and at any temperature. Sometimes the sweating happens at night when the patient is trying to sleep. This is often referred to as “night sweats,” but there isn’t any actual difference between night sweats and cold sweats. It’s all diaphoresis and it could be pointing to a larger problem. The sweating starts to become a sweating sickness, kinda like hyperhidrosis. But not the same thing.

Fever Sweating

A healthy person’s body tries to maintain a temperature around 98.6 degrees, although their temperature naturally fluctuates a little throughout the day (usually by .9 degrees). However, this changes when a person develops a fever.
Humans usually develop a fever in response to infection, inflammation, or trauma (fatigue). This underlying cause Fever can be defined as an adaptive response of the body to infection (or inflammation or irritation) in which the body increases its internal temperature above the usual 98.6 degrees. You can tell if you have a fever if your temperature is consistently higher than your normal or above 100.4 degrees. The body often uses fever as a tool to kill off foreign infections, but that is not always the case. The natural treatment option is rest and hydrate.
Once a person’s body starts the fever process it releases chemical messengers called pyrogens into the bloodstream. Pyrogens are part of the immune system and, through a complex chemical process, cause a person’s body to raise in temperature. Once a person has a fever they will often experience symptoms like headache, malaise, lack of appetite, and other sickness behaviors. A person with a fever will also experience heat generating mechanisms like skin vasoconstriction (blood vessels constricting) which leads to chills and goosebumps, shivering, and a desire to be warm. Once a person’s fever runs its course, the body needs to lower its core temperature. Sweating is the body’s only way to cool down so people who are recovering from a fever often experience sweating as a part of that process. Fever sweating may not be fun – but it’s actually a healthy response your body uses to take care of itself and this is why night sweats are so common. This is the body’s way to heal.

Other Situations

Excessive sweating that isn’t related to primary hyperhidrosis or fever (due to an infection or injury) can be a sign of something more serious. At this point it probably isn’t just ordinary fever sweating. Certain diseases and conditions can cause secondary hyperhidrosis. Secondary hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that is caused by an underlying issue. Some medications do cause secondary hyperhidrosis. It is wise to seek medical assistance if you suspect that you may have secondary hyperhidrosis, a high or long-term fever, or experience excessive sweating accompanied by pallor and/or diaphoresis. “Cold sweats” refers to sudden sweating that doesn’t come from heat or exertion. The medical term for cold sweats is diaphoresis. It comes from the body’s response to stress, called the fight or flight response. It’s very important to recognize cold sweats when providing first aid. It can be a sign of significant injury or illness, among other common causes.

Treatment

There is no specific treatment of cold sweats. To make them go away, we must treat the underlying cause. For example, if shortness of breath is causing sweats, helping the patient to breathe better and get more oxygen should help dry the skin. In other words, diaphoresis is not the problem; it is the sign or symptom of the problem. Recognizing cold sweats when they happen can help identify a problem before it gets too bad.

Common Causes

Anything that causes a fight or flight response in the body can cause cold sweats. What is done to fix the cold sweats or whatever the sickness is and depends on the cause.

Shock

Shock is dangerously low blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. The lack of blood flow delivers less oxygen and nutrients to the brain, which causes stress. Shock is a life-threatening condition and recognizing cold sweats is an important key to identifying shock.
Other things to look for if the rescuer suspects shock would be a sudden, rapid heartbeat, weak pulse, rapid breathing (over 20 breaths per minute), pale skin, and feeling weak or woozy when sitting up or standing.2
Shock doesn’t just happen, either. Cold sweats after a mechanism of injury like a car accident or a fall is enough of a concern to call 911. In the meantime, let the patient lie flat on his or her back and elevate the feet about 8 to 12 inches. Can also be from low blood sugar, heart palpitations or overall health issues. A health care provider should be contacted for help and evaluation.

Infection

Any infection that causes a fever can lead to cold sweats. It’s common for cold sweats or true night sweats come on as a fever “breaks” or starts to go back down. Really severe cases of infection, called sepsis, can lead to shock and therefore also to cold sweats. If the cold sweats come on without any preceding fever, or they are accompanied by the symptoms listed with shock above, call an ambulance.

Syncope

Another drop in blood pressure called syncope, which often causes fainting, can lead to diaphoresis. Many people will start sweating with severe or sudden nausea or vertigo. This is very similar to shock and lying flat on the back with the feet elevated also works for this. Call an ambulance for syncope.

Shortness of Breath

Severe shortness of breath can lead to a lack of oxygen in the bloodstream. When the patient’s brain begins to crave oxygen, a stress response is triggered, causing cold sweats, among other things. Look for other signs of shortness of breath in a patient with cold sweats, like fatigue with very little exercise or pursed-lip breathing. If the patient has oxygen, make sure it is on and call an ambulance.

Some activity will actually boost your body’s metabolism, as well as the body’s immune response, but a intense workout actually has an opposite effect. When the body is “over worked”, the body actually will release chemicals to repair itself to control the stress the body is under. One of the chemicals is steroids. Steroids actually decrease the ability of the cells that fight off infections to work and lower the immunity, temporarily.

If you’re wondering how much is too much, it’s considered mild to moderate, low impact for short periods of time. (30 minutes or less) For example, walking, light jogging, Yoga and/or meditation. You want to keep your body temperature in check and added excess perspiration low. Remember, hydration is key, Drink plenty of fluids, and keep electrolytes in check. Sports drink are even good, they have sugar which is good during the flu. Stay away from the caffeine and alcohol, they likely cause dehydration. Avoid dehydration at all cost.
There are certain foods you need to eat, like broth, chicken soup, yogurt, vitamin C enriched fruits, leafy greens, broccoli and oatmeal.

Germs at the Gym

Health conditions can be an issue when attending. Bacteria is everywhere. Remember a cold or flu can easily spread from person to person in indoor gyms. So take disinfectant wipes and use everywhere. Take no chances. Healthy lifestyle can change the outcome on how long the duration will be.
If you are going outside, check outside, you want to avoid really hot or really cold environments that can change your core body temp. One alternative might be a good walk on a treadmill.

Post-Illness Return to Activity

Once the symptoms become mild, the night sweats start to decrease and the hot flashes subside then the sweating sickness should become a thing of the past.
There is no hard guidance on how to return to work, your daily life or your exercise routine, just keep in mind that you have used up your reserves inside of you that have used to get you back to health. If you try to go back too soon, you risk the chance that the sickness will return, and the heartache of the night sweats, hot flashes and your quality of life is out the door.

If you do find yourself dealing with hyperhidrosis issue, underarm sweat, hand sweat, there are strong clinical strength antiperspirants to assist you to getting rid of excessive sweat. Hyperhidrosis is no fun and embarrassing. Sweating outside of having the flu is from the sweat glands over acting, and deodorants don’t do the job. Contact your pharmacist or dermatologist to discuss your treatment options, like specific medicines or other treatment options. A dermatologist is the most trained on treating hyperhidrosis or excessive sweat.

Cold Sweats. Source and how we deal with them

Cold Sweats. Source and how we deal with them

1. Causes of cold and night sweats

2. Common Symptoms

3. Complications

4. Treatments Options

5. Conclusion

 

A cold sweat is a sign of sudden, significant stress, which could be physical or psychological in origin, or a combination of the two.

The average person has 2 to 4 million sweat glands. There are two different kinds of overactive sweat glands: the eccrine, which are found all over the body and help control body temperature, and the apocrine, which are located primarily in the groin and underarm areas. This really does affect quality of life,

The sweat produced by the eccrine sweat glands is mostly water, which helps to cool the body down. While heat can sometimes trigger the apocrine sweat glands, these glands are usually activated by stress and hormonal changes, which is why they play a significant role in cold sweats and night sweats. Causes of night sweats is no difference from cold sweats. Starts from the same source.

 

Fast facts on cold sweats:

  • Sweating is primarily the body’s way of cooling itself off.
  • The activation of the fight or flight (stress) response usually triggers cold sweats.
  • Cold sweats or night sweats {bedtime): address the reason.

What are the causes?

The medical term for sudden, excessive sweating is diaphoresis-also known as hyperhidrosis. This kind of sweat isn’t caused by heat or exertion. It is set apart from regular sweating by what the person is doing when the sweating starts.

Under normal conditions, your body produces sweat to cool down your body temperature and to keep the skin cool. This is typically in response to environmental factors like the temperature on a hot summer day or when exercising. But with cold sweats, your sweat glands are being abnormally activated by something other than heat or activity, such as your built-in stress response. Since the specific details are not specific, most cold sweats are traced back to our fight or flight response. When you are in this mode, the heart rate increases, breathing becomes shallower, mouth gets dry and your sweat glands open. This medical condition may be caused by anxiety, stress, pain, and infection and night sweats are a reaction from the issues of the earlier.

Anxiety and stress are the most common prompts for the fight or flight response and the resulting cold sweats.

 

Other situations and conditions that prompt cold sweats

  • Anxiety disorders: Cold sweats can be a symptom of panic attacks, social anxiety, and generalized anxiety. Individuals who experience cold sweats, along with increasing and, at times, overwhelming levels of anxiety, should see a specialist to explore treatment options.
  • Pain and shock: Cold sweats with pain, often due to accidents or other injuries, can be a sign of increased heart rate, blood diverted to major organs, and low blood pressure. Prompt medical treatment is needed.
  • Heart attack: Cold sweats can be a warning sign of a heart attack. If an individual feels sweaty and clammy, short of breath, and is experiencing chest pain or palpitations of upper body or numbness of the arms, they should seek emergency care immediately.
  • Hypoxia: Hypoxia is the technical term for lack of oxygen, which can develop when areas in the body are not getting enough oxygen, perhaps due to blockage, injury, or exposure to poisons or allergens. It can cause cold sweats and requires immediate medical emergency treatment.
  • Hypoglycemia: Also known as low blood sugar, hypoglycemia occurs when an individual’s blood sugar drops below normal. This condition is a particular risk for people with diabetes. Common are lightheaded, sweating and even coma if it gets too low or high {hyperglycemia). An effective treatment of glucose meds will be ordered.
  • Hot flashes, night sweats, and menopause: Changes in hormone levels associated menopause and perimenopause can prompt bursts of sweating. Don’t get this confused with hyperhidrosis.
  • Infection: Sweating can be a sign of the body’s response to many different infections, including tuberculosis. As the body becomes stressed, the increase of perspiration rises.
  • Drug and Alcohol Withdraw: Withdraw-anyone going through the process of stopping alcohol or drugs use, there are often unpleasant side effects. One major side effect is breaking into a sudden cod sweat and these symptoms can set in quickly, as fast as four to twelve hours after the last dose of drugs or alcohol. The body’s response is a lack of neurochemicals is to trigger symptoms that sound a lot like a bad case of the flu. Patients also present with unexplained weight loss and rash. Like excessive sweat, extreme perspiration, confusion, insomnia, nausea, body aches, etc..
  • Medication Effects: A wide collection of medications, including hormones replacement therapy, antidepressants, powerful pain meds can cause some patients to break out in a cold sweat. Examples, naproxen, insulin, hydrocodone, and albuterol. If the patient is to get off, it should be under a physicians’ care to the drug can be titrated down. Night sweats can be brought on by withdraw from sleeping agents, tricyclic antidepressants, and oxybutynin.

What Causes Cold Sweats Illustration

Symptoms

The fight or flight response, which helped humans survive in a more physically dangerous world, prepared the body to battle or run away. The fight or flight response still operates in people today, but it is more likely triggered by a traffic jam than a saber-toothed tiger.

The physical responses sparked by the stress response include:

  • faster heartbeat
  • more rapid and shallow breathing
  • reduced blood flow to the digestive system, leading to less saliva and a dry mouth
  • the release of endorphins
  • the opening of sweat glands

Cold sweats are different from regular sweats in that they do not develop as part of the body’s cooling response. This means that people experiencing a cold sweat may have skin that is clammy and cool, and they may report feeling cold. Sometimes the skin may appear quite pale.

 

What are the complications?

Cold sweats on their own do not usually lead to complications. However, if cold sweats are due to underlying health conditions, such as a heart disease, life-threatening complications can develop. Also, because the skin is frequently wet, skin infections are a complication. People always ask: what is the difference? The night sweat refers specifically to a condition also known as sleep hyperhidrosis. It can leave your sheets soaking wet, but it is unrelated to the core temperature of your body heating up while you sleep. Night sweat typically results in a layer of sweat over your entire body, while cold sweats are usually more localized irritation-like your hands, underarms (armpits), hands, forehead, and feet.

 

Treatments

As it turns out, there is no specific treatment for primary hyperhidrosis or secondary hyperhidrosis. When it comes to relieving sweat, your best bet is to try to address its root cause. If your breakout in a sweat because of anxiety, for example, you may find relief with options like meditation and yoga. Your overall goal is to make sure you are getting plenty of oxygen to your brain, Cognitive behavior therapy can also be extremely helpful in addressing the areas of your life that trigger your fight or flight response.

In addition, getting regular, daily exercise and maintaining a healthy weight can help with how your body processes stress. In other words, the excessive perspiration itself is not necessarily the problem, it may be an indicator of a deeper issue, and always drink 8 ounces of water each day.

 

Common treatments for cold sweats include:


The following tips can help individuals manage and prevent cold sweats

1. Keeping skin clean and dry: Regular bathing and use of antibacterial soap will help individuals reduce odors associated with cold sweats. Making sure the skin is dry protects the skin, helps keep bacteria at bay and reduces redness of the affected area, clammy discomfort, and irritation.

2. Alternate shoes: Wearing different shoes on different days can help individuals with sweaty feet keep their feet dry and reduce odors. Sox should be changed daily.

3. Wear absorbent footwear: Wool socks and socks made for sports tend to absorb more moisture and are helpful for people with sweat issues.

4. Finding ways to relax: Practicing yoga, meditation, and biofeedback can help individuals reduce some of the stress that is at the root of the sweat.

5. Change your diet: Changing your diet will help with sweat. Reduce caffeine, practicing yoga, regular exercise, healthy lifestyle, meditation, and biofeedback can help individuals reduce some of the stress may be the root of the frequency of cold sweats. See our blog post “Have you ever noticed when you eat spicy food you begin to sweat?” This blog talks about certain foods that stimulate sweat. This can be the underlying cause.

 

Conclusion

Dealing with Unpleasant Sweat

Still, there are going to be times where medical treatment is not really in order. If you are getting uncontrolled perspiration because being around someone who makes you nervous, there is not a surgery for that. Instead, you want to deal specifically with the sweating itself. This is where antiperspirants and deodorants come into play.

Let us start with a strong antiperspirant. These are literally designed to reduce how much you sweat. Most of them will use aluminum chloride as an active ingredient. It is a aluminum salt and it is a proven ingredient. The good news, it works well, and it is harmless. What is worse is that cold sweat is stress sweat. That means it smells worse than your normal workout sweat. When you are stressed, your body produces a more potent chemical cocktail that seeps through the pores. Therefore, you want a good deodorant a that has antibacterial ingredients. A good idea, the best deodorant for your palms might not be the best deodorant for your feet. Remember; antiperspirants stop sweat, deodorants stop body odor and odor protection associated with sweat. Talk with a dermatologist to see which antiperspirant is best for you. Monray Antiperspirant is a strong clinical strength antiperspirant specifically designed to treat excessive sweat of the armpits, groin area, sweaty hands and sweaty feet and other parts of the body. It is a clinical strength product and effective antiperspirant; Dermatologist and Pharmacist consider Monray Antiperspirant to be their go-to antiperspirant as their first line therapy for hyperhidrosis and heavy sweating. Has a low side effect profile, meaning very low skin irritation, redness and itching.

If you keep all of it in mind, you can get your cold sweats under control. Sometimes, an underlying condition will be evident; for example, when a person is sweating due to the pain and shock of an injury. Treating the injury and managing the symptoms of shock can usually bring the perspiration under control. It is important to take care of the issue and take care of the hyperhidrosis.

References

Insulin https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/is-sweating-normal.

Under Treatment

What are the complications

Conclusion

Antiperspirant for Hands. Three product comparison for sweaty hands and excessive sweating

Antiperspirant for Hands. Three product comparison for sweaty hands and excessive sweating

he idea of shaking hands or holding hands with a love one, feels like a nightmare for folks who deal with clammy hands. Sweaty hands is more than just an embarrassing symptom whether it’s from being nervous or hot. For over 5% of the United States population, it is a problematic hereditary condition called Hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis does not just affect the hands. Most people who live with Hyperhidrosis suffer from extreme sweating on the feet, face, underarms, back, breasts, groin, and thighs. So much sweat can make daily life embarrassing; even if not life-threatening. Patients talk about their social life being very limited.


In this discussion, this article discusses Hyperhidrosis and comparing Monray vs Carpe  vs Sweatblock. These are three well-known antiperspirants that specifically address the needs of patients with an excessive sweating of the hands. A simple handshake with uncontrolled excess perspiration, is a nightmare. As Drysol is used for sweaty hands, it requires a prescription, so will not be discussed in this article.

What is Hyperhidrosis, and why does it cause excessive sweating?

The treatment of Hyperhidrosis is a condition that causes uncontrollable, excessive sweating all over the body.

It is most localized in certain parts of the body, like the hand, groin, foot, or underarm regions. Unlike normal sweating, this sweat is not a result of your body’s thermoregulation, but rather from a genetic condition of hyperactive sweat glands without a known underlying cause. 

Excessive sweating causes many people who have this condition to stress out further and suffer from anxiety. Simple acts like shaking someone’s hand, or finding sweat marks left behind on your chair induces panic. You would think there would not be sweat glands in your hands, but they are there, located mainly in the palm of your hand.

Added stress often triggers even more sweating, entering a never-ending spiral of perspiration and anxiety. Sounds awful, right? It is no wonder that depression is more than twice as common among hyperhidrosis suffers and quality of life is bad.

Though seemingly benign, when those with Hyperhidrosis suffer deal with the embarrassment every day, just going through the daily motions of life can cause constant shame. Most of those with palmar hyperhidrosis report avoiding touch with other people, including their significant others.


Another shocking statistic is that 70% of Hyperhidrosis patients have changed their careers due to their condition. Either out of embarrassment, or because their excessive sweat jeopardized their safety or physically not being able to do the task.

How can you tell if you have Hyperhidrosis?

Everyone sweats, and some its profusely. But how do you know if you suffer from hyperhidrosis or simply have active and healthy sweat glands? Below are common signs you have a chronic symptom:

  • You sweat when others do not: Even in cooler temperatures and without vigorous exercise, sweat beads up on your skin and soak your clothing. It may be impossible to wear makeup, as face sweating may cause smears or beads on your skin or your hands sweat just by moving.
  • Your excess sweat impairs daily activities: Whether your career requires you to constantly meet new people and shake hands, or your sweat creates dangerous challenges for you to perform your job. Your constant wet skin makes intimacy with your partner embarrassing and impossible, your daily life may be greatly impacted by your excess sweat.
  • You are subject to skin irritations and/or infections: Constant moisture can cause skin to turn white and peel, causing irritation. Alternatively, excessive sweating causes many to suffer from various kinds of yeast infections. In fact, the risk of skin infections is 3x higher amongst Hyperhidrosis sufferers!
  • Others in your family have it too: Hyperhidrosis is a hereditary condition, and most who have it have a family member who also suffers from it.

Types of Hyperhidrosis

Primary Hyperhidrosis

Primary Hyperhidrosis (focal hyperhidrosis) is the most common of Hyperhidrosis. It typically comes on during adolescence and is believed to be the result of an overactive sympathetic nervous system, which in turn causes overactive sweat glands.

Hands, feet, underarms, groin, face, and head are the most affected areas of the body for excessive sweat. Although embarrassing, Palmar Hyperhidrosis is not a serious health risk, but ask someone who has sweaty hands, and they will tell you otherwise.

Secondary Hyperhidrosis

Also known as Diaphoresis, this form of Hyperhidrosis arrives during adulthood, usually after 25 years old. Diaphoresis is often a symptom of other medical conditions, or medications, Night sweats are much more common with Secondary Hyperhidrosis, and the sweating occurs much more generalized over the entire body, not limited to certain areas.

 

What are the most common treatments for hyperhidrosis?

  • Antiperspirants: These are the first line of defense for Hyperhidrosis sufferers, even for folks that sweat from armpit sweat. Dermatologists consider these products to be first line therapy, and where they get most of their success. Most antiperspirants contain metallic salts, with some using aluminum chloride as an active ingredient. (Side effects include minor skin irritation.) Over-the-counter underarm antiperspirants contain between 2.5%-15% of aluminum salt concentrations. Most antiperspirants are not for use in children under 13 years of age. 
  • Iontophoresis: This is used for those who have tried antiperspirants but need something stronger. Iontophoresis treatments are applied to the hands and feet to dramatically decrease sweating by 81-91%. A medical device is used to pass mild electrical current through water and through the skin’s surface. Pretty ingenious. But for many, the electrical current passing thru the liquid can be too much for sweaty palms.
  • Botox Injections: Botox (botulinum toxin) is a treatment option used for severe cases of Axillary Hyperhidrosis, meaning excessive sweating in the underarms specifically. Botox is an injection that will block or interrupt the body’s secretion of a chemical “messenger” that is responsible for turning on the body’s sweat glands. Other small areas of the body that suffer from excessive sweat, like the face, under the breasts can also benefit greatly from Botox injections. Botox is not used as much compared to other forms of therapy. A Dermatologist is required to administer and process the injection and can be expensive.
  • Microwave Thermolysis: miraDry is a non-invasive handheld device that delivers precise, controlled electromagnetic energy beneath underarm skin to the specific areas where sweat glands are located, resulting in thermolysis, which is the decomposition by heat, of the sweat glands. miraDry is for use in the underarm region only and has not yet been cleared for other areas of the body.
  • Topical Anticholinergics: The active ingredient in the topical treatment Qbrexza is glycopyrronium tosylate, an anticholinergic formula. Qbrexza applies this formula with individually packaged clothes, or wipes, to be used at home once per day to reduce underarm sweating. It has been cleared by the FDA to be used on children as young as nine years old.
  • Oral Medications: There are several kinds of oral medications for Hyperhidrosis, including oral anticholinergics, beta blockers, and benzodiazepines. Oral anticholinergics can include glycopyrrolate, oxybutynin, benztropine, and propantheline. Likewise, beta blockers like propranolol, and benzodiazepines work on the central nervous system for short term use, by blocking the physical manifestations of anxiety, such as sweating.
  • ETS Surgery: Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (ETS) Surgery is the most invasive treatment for Hyperhydrosis. ETS Surgery attempts to interrupt the transmission of nerve signals from the spinal column to the sweat glands, preventing these nerve signals from turning on the sweat glands. This is a last resort.

Are antiperspirants actually first line therapy for excessive sweaters?

As mentioned above, antiperspirants are the first line of defense for Hyperhidrosis sufferers. They are the most popular because they are the least invasive and the most cost effective. 

Studies have shown that aluminum chloride compounds do create effective results for those suffering from Hyperhidrosis, though skin irritation can be a common side effect for antiperspirants that contain alcohol. 

Depending on the excessiveness of sweat, Hyperhidrosis sufferers can use regular antiperspirants from the market, clinical strength over-the-counter products, or prescription products. It is recommended to try the least strong formulas first and work your way up to minimize risk of irritation. To remind folks, deodorants do NOT stop sweat, they only cover up the bacteria on your skin. That bacteria mixed with water (sweat) causes the odor.

 

What is the best way to apply the antiperspirant?

The International Hyperhidrosis Society ref https://www.sweathelp.org/ recommends the following:

  • applying antiperspirant before bedtime
  • gently massaging antiperspirant into the skin
  • Spray antiperspirants usually work the best and apply a consistent application for hand applications. Lotions cause residue

Blog Chart

Which antiperspirant is best for you — Sweatblock, Carpe, or Monray?

Sweatblock, Carpe and Monray are three different antiperspirants, each with sweat-stopping solutions for hand sweat, that work well for different consumers. Since dermatologists recommend beginning with products that cause the least irritation, Monray stands out as the best overall at providing sweat and odor-free living without painful skin problems. As illustrated in the chart, Monray does not contain alcohol. This eliminates 90% of the irritation issues. You can see with the other two, making it the go-to clinical strength antiperspirant for people with sensitive skin. Monray is a consistent hyperhidrosis treatment for hands, but also for sweaty underarms and foot sweat.

Carpe’s wide range of products that target specific areas of the body, could be a better fit if you sweat acutely in only one area. But none have the punch like Monray and Sweatblock. Carpe’s foot formula no doubt much stronger than its face or groin formulas, and so experimentation may be required to find the best product to match your perspiration patterns.

Sweatblock can be a good option for underarm sweat, but when you go to hand sweat and foot sweat, they go toward a cream application and use a different active ingredient. They do offer different product for each part of the body, so experimentation is required for Sweatblock as well.

Hope this gives you a better understanding on which product may be best for you. Each product has something to offer, but with everything considered, Monray is the overall winner.

The idea of shaking hands or holding hands with a love one, feels like a nightmare for folks who deal with clammy hands. Sweaty hands is more than just an embarrassing symptom whether it’s from being nervous or hot. For over 5% of the United States population, it is a problematic hereditary condition called Hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis does not just affect the hands though. Most people who live with Hyperhidrosis also suffer from extreme sweating on the feet, face, underarms, back, breasts, groin, and thighs. So much sweat can make daily life embarrassing— even if not life-threatening— can create immense distress from anxiety, emotional stress or even depression or everyday physical activity. Patients talk about their social life being very limited.


In this discussion, we will be discussing Hyperhidrosis and comparing Monray vs Carpe ref https://mycarpe.com/ vs Sweatblock ref https://www.sweatblock.com/, three well-known antiperspirants that specifically address the needs of patients with an excessive sweating of the hands. A simple handshake with uncontrolled excess perspiration, is a nightmare. As Drysol is used for sweaty hands, it requires a prescription, so will not be discussed in this article.

What is Hyperhidrosis, and why does it cause excessive sweating?

The treatment of Hyperhidrosis is a condition that causes uncontrollable, excessive sweating all over the body, though it is most localized in certain parts of the body, like the hand, groin, foot, or underarm regions. Unlike normal sweating, this sweat is not a result of your body’s thermoregulation, but rather from a genetic condition of hyperactive sweat glands without a known underlying cause. 

Excessive sweating causes many people who have this condition to stress out further and suffer from anxiety. Simple acts like shaking someone’s hand, or finding sweat marks left behind on your chair when standing up can be panic inducing. You would think there would not be sweat glands in your hands, but they are there, located mainly in the palm of your hand.


This added stress often triggers even more sweating, entering a never-ending spiral of perspiration and anxiety. Sounds awful, right? It’s no wonder that depression is more than twice as common among hyperhidrosis suffers and quality of life is not good.

Though seemingly benign, when those with Hyperhidrosis suffer deal with the embarrassment every day, just going through the daily motions of life can cause constant shame. Most of those with palmar hyperhidrosis report avoiding touch with other people, including their significant others.


Another shocking statistic is that 70% of Hyperhidrosis patients have changed their careers due to their condition, either out of embarrassment, or because their excessive sweat jeopardized their safety or physically not being able to do the task.

How can you tell if you have Hyperhidrosis?

Everyone sweats, and some its profusely. But how do you know if you suffer from hyperhidrosis or simply have active and healthy sweat glands? Below are common signs you have a chronic symptom:

  • You sweat when others do not: Even in cooler temperatures and without vigorous exercise, sweat beads up on your skin and soak your clothing. It may be impossible to wear makeup, as face sweating may cause smears, smudges, or beads on your skin or your hands sweat just by moving.
  • Your excess sweat impairs daily activities: Whether your career requires you to constantly meet new people and shake hands, or your sweat creates dangerous challenges for you to perform your job, or your constant wet skin makes intimacy with your partner embarrassing and impossible, your daily life may be greatly impacted by your excess sweat.
  • You are subject to skin irritations and/or infections: Constant moisture can cause skin to turn white and peel, causing irritation. Alternatively, excessive sweating causes many to suffer from various kinds of yeast infections. In fact, the risk of skin infections is 3x higher amongst Hyperhidrosis sufferers!
  • Others in your family have it too: Hyperhidrosis is a hereditary condition, and most who have it have a family member who also suffers from it.

Types of Hyperhidrosis

Primary Hyperhidrosis

Primary Hyperhidrosis (focal hyperhidrosis) is the most common of Hyperhidrosis. It typically comes on during adolescence and is believed to be the result of an overactive sympathetic nervous system, which in turn causes overactive sweat glands.

Hands, feet, underarms, groin, face, and head are the most affected areas of the body for excessive sweat. Although embarrassing, Palmar Hyperhidrosis is not a serious health risk, but ask someone who has sweaty hands, and they will tell you otherwise.

Secondary Hyperhidrosis

Also known as Diaphoresis, this form of Hyperhidrosis arrives during adulthood, usually after 25 years old. Diaphoresis is often a symptom of other medical conditions, or medications, Night sweats are much more common with Secondary Hyperhidrosis, and the sweating occurs much more generalized over the entire body, not limited to certain areas.

 

What are the most common treatments for hyperhidrosis?

  • Antiperspirants: These are the first line of defense for Hyperhidrosis sufferers, even for folks that sweat from armpit sweat. Dermatologists consider these products to be first line therapy, and where they get most of their success. Most antiperspirants contain metallic salts, with some using aluminum chloride as an active ingredient. (Side effects include minor skin irritation.) Over-the-counter underarm antiperspirants contain between 2.5%-15% of aluminum salt concentrations. Most antiperspirants are not for use in children under 13 years of age. 
  • Iontophoresis: This is used for those who have tried antiperspirants but need something stronger. Iontophoresis treatments are applied to the hands and feet to dramatically decrease sweating by 81-91%. A medical device is used to pass mild electrical current through water and through the skin’s surface. Pretty ingenious. But for many, the electrical current passing thru the liquid can be too much for sweaty palms.
  • Botox Injections: Botox (botulinum toxin) is a treatment option used for severe cases of Axillary Hyperhidrosis, meaning excessive sweating in the underarms specifically. Botox is an injection that will block or interrupt the body’s secretion of a chemical “messenger” that is responsible for turning on the body’s sweat glands. Other small areas of the body that suffer from excessive sweat, like the face, under the breasts can also benefit greatly from Botox injections. Botox is not used as much compared to other forms of therapy. A Dermatologist is required to administer and process the injection and can be expensive.
  • Microwave Thermolysis: miraDry is a non-invasive handheld device that delivers precise, controlled electromagnetic energy beneath underarm skin to the specific areas where sweat glands are located, resulting in thermolysis, which is the decomposition by heat, of the sweat glands. miraDry is for use in the underarm region only and has not yet been cleared for other areas of the body.
  • Topical Anticholinergics: The active ingredient in the topical treatment Qbrexza is glycopyrronium tosylate, an anticholinergic formula. Qbrexza applies this formula with individually packaged clothes, or wipes, to be used at home once per day to reduce underarm sweating. It has been cleared by the FDA to be used on children as young as nine years old.
  • Oral Medications: There are several kinds of oral medications for Hyperhidrosis, including oral anticholinergics, beta blockers, and benzodiazepines. Oral anticholinergics can include glycopyrrolate, oxybutynin, benztropine, and propantheline, but these medications have not been studied for their use with Hyperhidrosis patients, but for other medical conditions. Likewise, beta blockers like propranolol, and benzodiazepines work on the central nervous system for short term use, by blocking the physical manifestations of anxiety, such as sweating.
  • ETS Surgery: Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (ETS) Surgery is the most invasive treatment for Hyperhydrosis. ETS Surgery attempts to interrupt the transmission of nerve signals from the spinal column to the sweat glands, preventing these nerve signals from turning on the sweat glands. This is a last resort.

 

Are antiperspirants actually first line therapy for excessive sweaters?

As mentioned above, antiperspirants are the first line of defense for Hyperhidrosis sufferers. They are the most popular because they are the least invasive and the most cost effective. 

Studies have shown that aluminum chloride compounds do create effective results for those suffering from Hyperhidrosis, though skin irritation can be a common side effect for antiperspirants that contain alcohol. 

Depending on the excessiveness of sweat, Hyperhidrosis sufferers can use regular antiperspirants from the market, clinical strength over-the-counter products, or prescription products. It is recommended to try the least strong formulas first and work your way up to minimize risk of irritation. To remind folks, deodorants do NOT stop sweat, they only cover up the bacteria on your skin. That bacteria mixed with water (sweat) causes the odor.

 

What is the best way to apply the antiperspirant?

The International Hyperhidrosis Society ref https://www.sweathelp.org/ recommends the following:

  • applying antiperspirant before bedtime
  • gently massaging antiperspirant into the skin
  • Spray antiperspirants usually work the best and apply a consistent application for hand applications. Lotions cause residue

Blog Chart

Which antiperspirant is best for you — Sweatblock, Carpe, or Monray?

Sweatblock, Carpe and Monray are three different antiperspirants, each with sweat-stopping solutions for hand sweat, that work well for different consumers. Since dermatologists recommend beginning with products that cause the least irritation, Monray stands out as the best overall at providing sweat and odor-free living without painful skin problems. As illustrated in the chart, Monray does not contain alcohol. This eliminates 90% of the irritation issues that you can see with the other two, making it the go-to clinical strength antiperspirant for people with sensitive skin. Monray is a consistent hyperhidrosis treatment for hands, but also for sweaty underarms and foot sweat.

Carpe’s wide range of products that target specific areas of the body, could be a better fit if you sweat acutely in only one area. But none have the punch like Monray and Sweatblock. Carpe’s foot formula no doubt much stronger than its face or groin formulas, and so experimentation may be required to find the best product to match your perspiration patterns.

Sweatblock can be a good option for underarm sweat, but when you go to hand sweat and foot sweat, they go toward a cream application and use a different active ingredient. They do offer different product for each part of the body, so experimentation is required for Sweatblock as well.

Hope this gives you a better understanding on which product may be best for you. Each product has something to offer, but with everything considered, Monray is the overall winner.

Does Shaving Your Armpits and Groin Reduce Sweat?

Does Shaving Your Armpits and Groin Reduce Sweat?

Treating and concealing sweat is a full-time job, but it does not have to be. You ask yourself: Does shaving help reduce sweat and odor. There is validity, and we will discuss how this does help.

Does shaving your armpits and groin reduce sweat?

The answer is no. Well, no on sweat and yes on odor. Shaving will not make you sweat less. However, it will help the antiperspirant adhere better to the skin, allowing it to do its job, making it more effective to work and will reduce the odor associated with sweat.

Therefore, shaving these areas do not help you sweat less.

Understanding sweat.

Sweat happens when your body temperature starts to go up and gets to high. The sweat is to cool the skin and by putting water on the skin, evaporates, creating a cooling sensation. You can also sweat by being nervous, stressed, anxious or medical condition. These things have nothing to do with your armpit hair and everything to do with your eccrine and apocrine glands.

Your eccrine glands perspire when you exert yourself and increase your internal body temperature, therefore you sweat under your arms and groin. Your apocrine glands react to stress signals from your brain. These two factors alone dictate how much you sweat. Once again, this is not affected due to hair being there or not.

How to shave your armpits and groin (men)

Shaving your underarms and “down there” can be intimidating. Before you shave these areas, clean, and rinse these areas with warm water – preferably in the shower. The heat and moisture help soften your hair follicles and make nicks and tugging less likely. The cleaner the area seems to make it go smoother, causing less nicks. Once the area is soaked, wash the area with an antibacterial soap and scrub the area clean.

Apply shave gel or cream

Face shaving cream will work fine, or shaving gel is good, too. Apply enough to create a good lather. Do not use soap. This will not provide a good “glide” especially when you are shaving the “man jewels”. Make sure you use a new razor each time. You do not want to use a blade that is dull. Make sure your razor has a flexible, removable head and multiple blades. The razor

head probable will not last as when you shave your face. You will be shaving for a longer period and the hair will be coarser.  

Shaving Groin And Man Jewels

There are newer electric razors especially designed to shave the underarms and especially the groin. The lawn mower 3.0 by Manscaped is by far the best for shaving the jewels. It is waterproof, no-slip grip. Comes with a led light, helping you in baths that are not well lit in the shower.

After you shave, make sure you put a skin moisturizer on the shaven area. This will cut down on irritation. Most importantly, DO NOT apply your antiperspirant for the first 24 hours. Give it a day and make sure there is no irritation before you apply your strong antiperspirant.

In conclusion

Shaving will not stop sweat, but it will help your antiperspirant adhere to the skin, and shaving will reduce odor with associated sweating.

Diseases and Conditions that Can Cause Diaphoresis

Diseases and Conditions that Can Cause Diaphoresis

There are a number of diseases and medical conditions can cause diaphoresis (excess perspiration or sweating). Diseases and medical issues are common in their names are recognized even by patients.  Some are rare or obscure.  This list is a resource, and in no way meant to replace consultation with a medical professional.  Although sweating is a side effect of these conditions listed, only a percentage of people are affected by these conditions may experience sweating.

Common Diseases/Conditions

  • Acute Febrile Illness (e.g. infection)
  • Alcoholism
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Gout
  • Heart Failure
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Lymphoma
  • Menopause
  • Obesity
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Pregnancy
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis

Nervous System Mediated Conditions

Cortical Condition (mediated by the cerebral cortex)

  • Congenital autonomic dysfunction with universal pain loss
  • Congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex
  • Gopalan’s syndrome
  • Palmoplantar
  • keratodermas
  • Pachyonychia congenita (Jadassohn-Lewandowsky syndrome)
  • Pressure and postural hyperhidrosis
  • Nail-patella syndrome

Hypothalamic Conditions (mediated by the hypothalamus)

  • Acute infection
  • Alcoholism
  • Carcinoid syndrome
  • Cardiac shock
  • Chediak-Higashi syndrome
  • Chronic Arsenic intoxication
  • Chronic infection (e.g. tuberculosis, malaria, brucellosis)
  • Cold injury
  • Debility
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Drug addiction (e. g. cocaine, amphetamines)
  • Drugs
  • Familial dysautonomia
  • Erythrocyanosis
  • Essential hyperhidrosis
  • Exercise
  • Gout
  • Heart failure (congestive heart failure)
  • Hines-Bannick syndrome
  • Hyperpituitarism
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Hypothalamic mass ( e. g. : tumor, abscess)
  • Idiopathic unilateral circumscribed hyperhidrosis
  • Infantile scurvy
  • Lymphoma
  • Menopause
  • Obesity
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Pheochromocytoma
  • Phenylketouria
  • POEMS syndrome
  • Porphyria
  • Post-enchepahlitis
  • Pregnancy
  • Pressure and Postural Hyperhidrosis
  • Raynard’s phenomenon or disease
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Rickets
  • Stroke/cerebrovascular accident/transient ischemic attack ( affecting hypothalamus)
  • Symmetric lividity of the palms and soles
  • Vitiligo

Medullary/Spinal Conditions (mediated by the medulla oblongata or spinal nerves)

  • Auriculotemporal syndrome
  • Encephalitis
  • Granulosis rubra nasi
  • Physiologic gustatory sweating
  • Post-traumatic (spinal cord transaction or thoracic sympathetic chain injury)                           
  • Syringomyelia
  • Tabes dorsalis

Peripheral-Reflexive Conditions

  • Drugs/medications
  • Perilsional (e. g. burn)

Non-Neural Conditions

  • Arteriovenous fistula
  • Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome
  • Cold erythema
  • Drugs
  • Glomus tumors
  • Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome
  • Local heat
  • Maffucci’s syndrome
So Uniquely Effective... It's Guaranteed! Monray
How to Prepare for a Job Interview in 2020

How to Prepare for a Job Interview in 2020

Preparation is key to a successful interview. The more prepared the more confident you will feel on the actual day of the interview. Planning and setting a timetable will be key to have everything in place. The pressure is on. You have impressed the hiring manager with your resume enough to advance in the process, and how you handle the interview will decide if you move forward. The employer is hiring to fill a need—you must show that you are the best fit. “Every position is centered on a problem.

Gather as Much Information

Do as much research as you can about the employer ahead of your interview. When researching employers, LinkedIn is the most accessible resource. I recommend also “ask[ing] current employees at the company that you know about the interviewers.” Not only will this give you the inside scoop, but it will also provide a better sense about the company culture. Finally, become familiar with the position. Review the company website and all social media to understand the company. Having a good understanding of the company, the questions you will ask will be more in depth. Remember, an attorney (or a good one I should say) does not ask a question that he/she doesn’t already know the answer. Like their product portfolio, customer base, mission statement, growth, and core values. The more information you gather, the better you will be able to tailor your responses.

     Talent will get you in the door, character will keep you in the room

Practice Responding to the Questions

In front of the mirror. That is right, in front of the mirror. There are standard interview questions most managers are going to ask, regardless of the job. These include “Tell me about yourself,” “What’s your biggest weakness?” and “Why are you interested in this job?” Practice responding to these common questions, so you become comfortable and do not forget the key points you want to make.

Compile Your Stats

Interviewer managers do not want to know what you were responsible for doing in your previous jobs, they want to know how well you performed and relate it to the position you are applying for. Prepare for your interview by compiling achievements, such as specific examples you can describe or stats that objectively quantify your claims (rankings or percentages). This allows you to show, rather than tell, that you are a top performer. Have your brag book ready.

Questions on your Own

Since interviewers typically open the conversation for questions from you in the end, you want to be ready to present thoughtful questions that demonstrate your professionalism and enthusiasm for the position. Come up with questions of your own ahead of time to ask. I suggest that applicants select 5 good anecdotes to have ready for the interview by considering the following questions: “P—What was the project, problem or performance objective that needed to be addressed? What were some challenges you faced in meeting your objectives? A—Describe the specific action you took. It does not matter if you are referencing a team effort or group project; you need to highlight your contributions that lead to a successful result. R—State the positive result. Numbers can be impressive, especially if used in comparisons.” Not only will these anecdotes clearly detail your role and accomplishments at your previous organizations, but the format also allows the interviewer to better remember you.

Remember this is an interview, not an interrogation.

Project the Image You Want

Your interview responses are not the only factor on which you are evaluated – it is the overall impression you give, from your appearance to your body language to your punctuality and preparedness. 

                             “Don’t be afraid of silence”.

When you’re nervous, a minute of silence can feel like an hour.  Moments of pause are normal and can show thoughtfulness. “Don’t rush to answer a question that requires some thought and reflection on your part,”  After you’ve responded, allow the interviewer time to process your answer and jot down notes—“don’t feel the need to fill silence with extended responses or nervous chatter”.

Show your personality. Smile, look pleasant, show you are happy to be there even if you are scared to death. Plan, Plan, Plan, the image you want to project. Select a professional outfit and ensure it is clean, wrinkle-free, and properly fitted. Practice your handshake and introduction, so you are speaking with confidence, maintaining eye contact, and smiling. If your hands get clammy or start sweating when you get anxious, invest in a strong antiperspirant that treats hand sweat. I recommend Monray Antiperspirant. It shows really good reviews for its hand protection. Want a deal breaker; shake the interviewers’ hand with wet hands. Instant turn-off. Also,  pack your belongings ahead of time, have extra copies of your resume and a pad and paper for taking notes during the interview. And finally, plan your route to the interview location and give yourself plenty of extra time, so you don’t risk running late.

Ask for the Job

I can’t tell you how many times I hear, they never asked me for the business. I can tell you one thing, do not ask and you will not move forward, especially if you are in any type of a sales interview. Be confident and let them know you want this job.

Conclusion

Interviews can be a very tedious and involved process, but with adequate planning and preparedness, it can provide positive outcomes. There are professional coaches, resumes and recruiters to help thru your process. One such person is Tynesha Haynes with Haynes Talent Solutions. She can be reached at tynesha.haynes@gmail.com

Handling Excessive Sweat in Winter? For REAL???

Handling Excessive Sweat in Winter? For REAL???

Cold weather is a time to increase layering up with clothing and staying warm. But if you are sweating through your winter layers, chances are you might be sweating for other reasons, this can put you out of the seasonal spirit. Those with hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating, also called other things like sweaty underarms, armpit sweat, hand sweat or other areas as well. You would think this would not be a problem when it is 40 outside–right, but this medical condition can be particularly challenging in the winter. These steps will help you stay dry, so you can enjoy your favorite cloths or enjoy the outdoors with confidence. No one wants to deal with armpit sweat, sweaty feet or hand sweat at this time of year.

 

What Is this clinical condition: Hyperhidrosis?

Hyperhidrosis is a condition that causes excessive sweating. If you experience hyperhidrosis, you might sweat in cold weather or when you are sitting still. This condition most often affects the underarms, face, hands, and feet.

Hyperhidrosis does not always have a clear cause, but people often experience excessive sweating because their eccrine sweat glands are always active. This may be linked to an underlying condition like thyroid issues, diabetes, and nervous system disorders. Hyperhidrosis may also be genetic.

If you sweat excessively without a clear cause, book an appointment with your doctor, or talk with your pharmacist. They can provide a diagnosis and investigate an underlying condition as a root cause. If you already have a hyperhidrosis diagnosis, a dermatologist can recommend excessive sweating treatments to keep you comfortable this winter.

 How to handle sweat in a winter jacket

How Can You Manage Excessive Sweating in the Winter?

Hyperhidrosis can cause you to sweat through your clothes, even in the winter. You might also notice that your palms and feet are sweaty when you are otherwise feeling chilly or just sitting in a chair. Risk factors can come in a variety of ways. While sweating like this can be uncomfortable and embarrassing, there are options for relief. A dermatologist can recommend several hyperhidrosis treatment options, including:

  • Prescription Antiperspirants or clinical-strength antiperspirants: Over-the-counter deodorants are NOT effective with hyperhidrosis. Primary hyperhidrosis is the main name for this disorder. Remember, deodorants do not stop sweat, they mask the body odor associated with the sweat (moisture). In this case, your dermatologist may recommend a clinical strength antiperspirant as the first step in treatment. Make sure you review with your doctor or pharmacist, on which one will be best for you, Also, check to make sure they have low skin irritation, and effectiveness. Some contain an active ingredient aluminum chloride (aluminum salt), so make sure the product does not contain alcohol. This ingredient is the main ingredient to block the sweat duct. Natural deodorants usually do not work with people with these issues). Keep side effects low, especially for sensitive skin or irritation. Perspiration can affect all parts of your body. You can generally use these products on the underarms, hands, feet, and other affected areas. Antiperspirants are the gold standard for body odor, perspiration increases in body temperature,
  • Topical Treatments: Dermatologists may recommend creams that contain glycopyrrolate as treatment for excessive sweating on the head and face. They have limited use.
  • Thermal Treatment: Through this type of treatment, a dermatologist would target the sweat glands using a hand-held thermal device. Some people will experience results in as little as one session. This is a little more aggressive and would not recommend unless all antiperspirants fail.
  • Medications: Certain oral medications can block the nerves that cause sweating. These work by preventing the nerves from communicating with each other. Since these products are taken orally, side effects are more common.
  • Botox Injections: Botox can be an effective treatment for excessive sweating in the underarms. You will likely need to return for a series of injections, since it can take four to six months to notice results. Cost is also a big factor with Botox. It should only be uses as last resort or before surgery.
  • Iontophoresis machines can be used also. Iontophoresis is a process of transdermal drug delivery by use of a voltage gradient on the skin. Molecules are transported across the stratum corneum by electrophoresis (electrical current) and electroosmosis and the electric field can also increase the permeability of the skin basically this machine runs a low voltage over the area of the sweating issue. This machine is usually used for people who have hand sweat.
  • Surgery: If alternative treatments are not effective, your dermatologist may recommend surgery. The surgical procedure would likely involve either removing the sweat glands or the associated nerves. This is a last resort. This procedure has discomfort and still could not work.

Keep in mind that you may need to try a number of treatments to control your hyperhidrosis, especially in severe cases. Be sure to track your symptoms and see your dermatologist regularly. They will ensure that your treatments are working for you. Remember you will want and effective treatment and or an effective antiperspirant for different parts of the body. A strong antiperspirant will give you an advantage over using a deodorant for stopping body odor, or overall odor. Deodorants can’t fill the void of stopping moisture related issues and keeping you from wearing your favorite wool outfit. With all the issues of 2020, you need your quality of life wherever you can.

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